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60 YEARS ROME TREATY ? STAKEHOLDER COALITION PRESS RELEASE - 23/03/2017

Insurance, leasing, dealers, vehicle inspection, automotive aftermarket and consumers coalition:

 

“Keeping the principles of the Treaty of Rome alive in the automotive digital age”

 

 

 

Brussels, 23 March 2017. A broad industry and motorists representativecoalition calls upon the EU to create a robust regulatory framework for an interoperable in-vehicle telematics platform based on key principles derived from the Treaty of Rome: fair competition, independent entrepreneurship, innovation and consumer choice

 

The Treaties of Rome that were signed 60 years ago marked the start of what has become the European Union. Since then, we have seen radical paradigm shifts in human, industrial and societal behaviour and increased digitalisation of processes. 60 years ago, the cars that drove Paul-Henri Spaak and the other signatories to the Palazzo dei Conservatori in Rome did not even remotely resemble today’s cars. Now, the ‘connected car’ is becoming part of our daily connected mobility.

 

Our sectors face groundbreaking changes, which require a robust regulatory framework for ‘fair digitalisation chances’. The digitalisation of the EU industry is imminent, and we hope that the EU decision-makers will make it beneficial to all, especially SMEs, which are the backbone of the EU economy and provide quality services to consumers.

 

As a broad industry coalition we stand united in our belief that competition, innovation, independent entrepreneurship and consumers interests are the fundamental pillars of today’s and tomorrow’s European Union. In the automotive sector, competition in the digital age starts in the vehicle where the quality and accessibility of in-vehicle generated data determines the service quality that can be offered and chosen by the consumer.  However, the curent design of closed telematics vehicle systems controls the flow of data to and from the vehicle and seriously limits competition and innovation on all services and products “around the car”. This is clearly explained in our è video.

 

In the highly competitive markets for vehicle sales, servicing and repair, insurance, leasing and rentals, mandated periodic inspection, spare parts and diagnostic test tools, ‘free flow of data’ and interoperability are key. Only these enable true choice in digital services and empower vehicle owners’ right to decide with whom they share their data and for what purposes.

 

Our coalition calls upon the European Institutions to breathe life into the digital transformation, by creating a robust regulatory framework for an interoperable, standardised, secure and safe digital in-vehicle telematics platform. Building the EU of the 21st century starts by holding on to the fundamental principles of fair competition, innovation and entrepreneurship, freedom of consumer choice. Although in a different shape, these principles should stand as strong as they have for the last 60 years.

 

 

 

 

 

Coalition for a competitive vehicle service industry in the digital era

 

ADPA – the European Independent Data Publishers Association aims to ensure fair access to automotive data and information and to provide competitive framework conditions for independent data publishers. This will allow the publishers to be able to design and provide competitive, innovative and multibrand products and services to operators of the automotive aftermarket.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CECRA- the European Council for Motor Trades and Repairs- is the European Federation representing the interests of the motor trade and repair businesses and European Dealer Councils on behalf of vehicle dealers for specific makes. Its main aim is to maintain a favourable European regulatory framework for the enterprises of motor trade and repair businesses it represents. Contact: Bernard Lycke – Director General – Bernard.lycke@cecra.eu – tel: +32 2 771 96 56.

 

 

 

CITA – the international association of public and private sector organisations actively practicing compulsory inspection of in-service motor vehicles and their trailers, or with responsibility for authorising and supervising inspection organisations.

Contact: Eduard Fernández – Executive Director – secretariat@citainsp.org – Tel: +32 2 469 06 70.

 

 

 

 EGEA- the European Garage and test Equipment Association represents both manufacturers and importers of tools and equipment for the repair, servicing and technical inspection of vehicles, as an integral part of supporting the automotive industrial value chain. Its role is to ensure that its associations’ members can provide the best equipment and service to the automotive aftermarket by striving to keep members up-to-date concerning new vehicle technologies, legislative and standardisation requirements and thus be competitive in the garage and test equipment supply, service and calibration industry. Contact: Eléonore van Haute – Secretary General – Eleonore.vanhaute@egea-association.eu – tel: +32 2 761 95 15.

 

 

        

The FIA is a worldwide federation of Motoring and Touring Clubs. The FIA Region I represents the interest of these members as motorists, public transport users, pedestrians and tourists in Europe. Its primary goal is to secure a mobility that is safe, affordable, sustainable and efficient. Contact: Laurianne Krid – Policy Director – lkrid@fia.com – tel: +32 2 282 08 18.

 

 

 

 

 

 

FIGIEFA is the international federation of independent automotive aftermarket distributors. Its members represent retailers and wholesalers of automotive replacement parts and components and their associated repair chains. FIGIEFA’s aim is to maintain free and effective competition in the market for vehicle replacement parts, servicing and repair.

Contact: Sylvia Gotzen – Chief Executive– Sylvia.gotzen@figiefa.eu – tel: +32 2 761 95 10.

 

Insurance Europe is the European insurance and reinsurance federation. Through its 35 member bodies — the national insurance associations — Insurance Europe represents all types of insurance and reinsurance undertakings, eg pan-European companies, monoliners, mutuals and SMEs. Insurance Europe, which is based in Brussels, represents undertakings that account for around 95% of total European premium income. Insurance makes a major contribution to Europe’s economic growth and development. European insurers generate premium income of €1 200bn, directly employ over 975 000 people and invest nearly €9 800bn in the economy. Contact: Thomas Gelin, Policy Advisor, Tel: +32 2 894 30 48, Gelin@insuranceeurope.eu

 

       

 

 

 

Leaseurope - the European Federation of Leasing Company Associations- represents both the leasing and automotive rental industries in Europe. The scope of products covered by Leaseurope members’ ranges from hire purchase and finance leases to operating leases of all asset categories (automotive, equipment and real estate). It also includes the short-term rental of cars, vans and trucks.

Contact: Richard Knubben - Director – r.knubben@leaseurope.com – tel: +32 2 778 05 68.

Joint Declaration for an ambitious EU industrial strategy - 16/02/2017

Joint Declaration for an ambitious EU industrial strategy


Europe is the cradle of the manufacturing industry and has been at the forefront of industrial revolutions and technological innovations. The industry directly employs over 34 million people across all Member States, in supply chains comprising hundreds of thousands of SMEs and larger suppliers. It also indirectly accounts for millions of additional jobs in related sectors.


The European manufacturing industry has tremendous capacity for research and innovation, boasts a skilled workforce and has earned a global reputation for quality and sustainability. What it now needs is the swift and determined support of the European institutions and the Member States to create more jobs and growth in Europe.

At the beginning of his mandate, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker identified the reindustrialisation of Europe as one of his top priorities and confirmed the objective of increasing the share of industry in the European GDP to 20% by 2020. As we approach the preparation of the next Multiannual Financial Framework, it is vital for the European Commission to act and help the EU remain a competitive global industrial power playing in a fairer world market.

Therefore we, the European manufacturing industry, representing a diverse range of sectors, call on the European Commission to:

  • reaffirm its commitment to reaching the target of 20% of GDP from industry, with an ambitious and realistic timeline;

  • adopt an Action Plan to tackle the challenges that the industrial sectors are facing, in the framework of a Communication that would include concrete steps and milestones; and

  • commit to implement this Action Plan in a timely manner and regularly report on progress.


Member States and the European Parliament clearly stated their full support for a strong European industrial strategy via the European Council Conclusions calling to strengthen and modernise the EU’s industrial base (15 December 2016) and the Parliament Resolution on the need for a European reindustrialisation policy (5 October 2016).

 

We, the Signatories of this Joint Declaration, are ready to step up our cooperation with the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Competitiveness Council to define and implement this ambitious and coordinated European industrial strategy that will help safeguard the world leadership of European manufacturers and jobs in Europe.

Insurance, automotive aftermarket, dealers, leasing and consumers coalition says: ACEA/CLEPA position on access to vehicle da - 09/12/2016

Brussels, 9 December 2016. The undersigned are united in their concern that consumers’ interest are not being placed at the centre of discussions around the possible technical solutions to access in-vehicle data. In addition to undermining free consumer choice, the solution promoted by some stakeholders would also undermine competition, innovation and independent entrepreneurship.

 

European parts suppliers and vehicle manufacturers recently presented a common technical architecture to access in-vehicle data. This approach would channel all future communication and data access through the vehicle manufacturer’s proprietary server. Only part of the data generated would then be sent to a ‘neutral server’ and be accessible for independent operators. This solution – which would be based on the Extended Vehicle – would not allow direct communication with the vehicle and still grants vehicle manufacturers full control to decide how, when and to whom (mainly aggregated) data access will be granted.

 

Our broad industry coalition believes this solution undermines vehicle owners’ right to decide who they share their data with and for what purposes. We also consider this to be a serious threat to competition, innovation and consumer choice in the digital era. Today, vehicle manufacturers and their partner suppliers now compete on the market for a wide range of vehicle-related services and products (e.g. financial, leasing, insurances, diagnostics, replacement parts etc.) that are increasingly reliant on real time in-vehicle data. In this new digital age, it is not sufficient to only have direct access to the in-vehicle data only through an interoperable physical interface - a digital communication lifeline is also needed.

 

Ensuring safety and security is crucial for the deployment of connected vehicles and we believe that an ‘in-vehicle interoperable, standardised, secure and open-access platform’ is the right way forward. This solution would ensure the same  high level of safety, security, liability and data protection as the vehicle manufacturers’ solution, whilst safeguarding competition, innovation and consumer choice. It could be based on the existing vehicle manufacturers’ telematics systems and use the highest possible security standards. Many manufacturers allow chosen partners to operate their own systems and applications in their vehicles today, thus showing that safe and secure direct access is possible without interfering with the vehicle’s functions.

The undersigned call upon the European Institutions to create a robust regulatory framework for an interoperable, standardised, secure and safe digital in-vehicle telematics platform as intended by the eCall Mandate, to maintain true consumer choice, independent entrepreneurship, competition and innovation for all services “around the car”.


The undersigned Associations:

 

ADPA (European Independent Data Publishers Association), Laurence Eeckhout, EU Affairs Manager, laurence.eeckhout@adpa.eu  – tel: +32 2 761 95 16/ CECRA (European Council for Motor Trades and Repairs), Bernard Lycke, Director General, Bernard.lycke@cecra.eu , tel: +32 2 771 96 56 / EGEA(European Garage and Test Equipment Association), Eléonore van Haute, Secretary General,  Eleonore.vanhaute@egea-association.eu,  tel: +32 2 761 95 15 / FIA (Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile), Laurianne Krid, Policy Director, lkrid@fia.com , tel: +32 2 282 08 18 / FIGIEFA (Automotive Aftermarket Distributors), Sylvia Gotzen, Chief Executive, Sylvia.gotzen@figiefa.eu,  tel: +32 2 761 95 10 /  Insurance Europe (European insurance and reinsurance federation), Thomas Gelin, Policy Advisor, Tel: +32 2 894 30 48, Gelin@insuranceeurope.eu / Leaseurope (European Federation of Leasing Company Associations), Richard Knubben, Director, r.knubben@leaseurope.com ,  tel: +32 2 778 05 68.


European manifesto for Fair Access to the Vehicle in a Digital Single Market - 20/07/2016

Fair and Equal Access to Vehicles

in a Digital Single Market   

 

 Implementing the eCall mandate

on the ‘interoperable telematics platform' in line with

the principles for fair competition and free consumer choice

 

The Europe-wide mandatory introduction of ‘eCall’ in all new passenger cars from 2018 will accelerate the deployment of telematics technology and the development towards the ‘smart connected car’. The eCall basic telematics functionalities can easily be extended to provide a wide-ranging array of remote services such as traffic information, hotel bookings, directions to the nearest parking place, usage based insurance schemes, breakdown services or – in the case of the automotive aftermarket - remote diagnostics or predictive maintenance.

 

The undersigned associations represent a wide range of stakeholders directly impacted by the telematics deployment, such as motoring consumers, leasing companies and the entire aftermarket sector representing parts producers, parts wholesalers, diagnostic and test equipment manufacturers, data publishers as well as repairers.

 

The undersigned associations do welcome the technological advance, which can benefit consumers and provide innovative new business opportunities – as long as fair competition is safeguarded.

 

Currently, telematics platforms are technically designed in a proprietary way that allows only vehicle manufacturers to have direct access to the vehicle and its data – creating an undue advantage, which could ultimately be to the detriment of consumers, businesses, the European economy and society.

 

The EU Institutions acknowledged this challenge through Article 12 (2) of the eCall Regulation requiring the Commission to ‘assess the need of requirements for an interoperable, standardised, secure and open-access platform’. The Commission is due to decide on a legislative initiative by June 2017.

 

One of the concepts under discussion suggests channelling the remote communication for independent market operators through the vehicle manufacturers’ proprietary servers (the ‘Extended Vehicle’).  This would give vehicle manufacturers exclusive control of access to in-vehicle data and information (who, when, what, how), allowing them to determine the access conditions, impose their own business models and monitor the businesses and processes of independent stakeholders - with whom they directly compete in the Automotive Aftermarket and with a wider range of other vehicle-related services (e.g. financial, leasing, insurances). This would negatively impact independent operators and service providers’ ability to compete.

‘Competition neutrality by technical design’ is required to preserve entrepreneurial independence and maintain a level playing field in the digital era. True innovation and the opportunity to develop new business models will only be possible through an interoperable platform.

 

Independent service providers need equal access to the same functionalities and information with the same timescale as the vehicle manufacturer to compete. Only then will motoring consumers have a true choice of service providers and be able to authorise the direct, unmonitored access to their vehicle-related data for the services they choose. This will in turn guarantee that alternative, independent service options can continue to be offered.

 

Therefore, the undersigned associations call upon the European Institutions to recognise the competitive role of telematics and so empower consumers to choose partners to whom and for which purpose they will give their data. This means also enabling independent operators to offer competitive digital products and services by protecting their right of direct access to in-vehicle real-time data/information and of online communication through standardised, interoperable and secure telematics interfaces. The design of the open-access telematics platform shall preclude the possibility of monitoring and profiling by vehicle manufacturers. It will safeguard an equal opportunity for independent operators and service providers to present their services to consumers via e.g. the embedded in-vehicle display, in the same manner as vehicle manufacturers. 

 

Until such time a fully functional in-vehicle platform is made available, a standardised communication access to the in-vehicle data via a physical data link connection shall be maintained.

 

All these technical requirements are needed to ensure a free consumer choice and a level playing field between all stakeholders to maintain the innovation capacity and competitiveness of all service providers ‘around the car’. In the long term, this can only be ensured by a technical solution where the ‘intelligence’ is in the vehicle, by implementing a standardised interoperable in-vehicle telematics platform, as intended by the eCall Mandate.

 

The undersigned associations call upon the European Institutions to create a robust regulatory framework for an interoperable, standardised, secure and open-access in-vehicle telematics platform, as advocated by the undersigned associations in the C-ITS Platform, and in line with the goals of the “Access pillar” from the Digital Single Market Strategy.

 

 

 

  Brussels, 30th June 2016

 

 


 

 

 

ADPA – the European Independent Data Publishers Association aims to ensure fair access to automotive data and information and to provide competitive framework conditions for independent data publishers. This will allow the publishers to be able to design and provide competitive, innovative and multibrand products and services to operators of the automotive aftermarket.

 

 

 

 

 

AIRC- the Association Internationale des Réparateurs en Carrosserie - is the global federation of leading national trade organisations in the area of vehicle repairs. Its main aims are to promote vehicle repairs and the vehicle repair industry and to ensure the future of this industry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

CECRA- the European Council for Motor Trades and Repairs- is the European Federation representing the interests of the motor trade and repair businesses and European Dealer Councils on behalf of vehicle dealers for specific makes. Its main aim is to maintain a favourable European regulatory framework for the enterprises of motor trade and repair businesses it represents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 EGEA- the European Garage and test Equipment Association represents both manufacturers and importers of tools and equipment for the repair, servicing and technical inspection of vehicles, as an integral part of supporting the automotive industrial value chain. Its role is to provide a healthier environment for the garage and test equipment industry throughout Europe and a stronger support to ensure competitive consumer choices for affordable mobility against the background of the increasing vehicle technology and complexity.

 

 

 

        

The FIA is a worldwide federation of Motoring and Touring Clubs. The FIA represents the interest of these members as motorists, public transport users, pedestrians and tourists. Its primary goal is to secure a mobility that is safe, affordable, sustainable and efficient.

 

 

 

FIGIEFA is the international federation of independent automotive aftermarket distributors. Its members represent retailers and wholesalers of automotive replacement parts and components and their associated repair chains. FIGIEFA’s aim is to maintain free and effective competition in the market for vehicle replacement parts, servicing and repair.

 

 

 

 

 

Leaseurope - the European Federation of Leasing Company Associations- represents both the leasing and automotive rental industries in Europe. The scope of products covered by Leaseurope members’ ranges from hire purchase and finance leases to operating leases of all asset categories (automotive, equipment and real estate). It also includes the short term rental of cars, vans and trucks.

EGEA supporting independent emission testing in the EU throughout the whole life cycle of the vehicle! - 19/07/2016

EGEA supporting independent emission testing in the EU throughout the whole life cycle of the vehicle!

 

EGEA, the European Garage Equipment Association, represents the interests of 12 national associations/industry members, which includes the majority of test equipment manufacturers who manufacture and support vehicle test equipment used throughout Europe, including vehicle emissions testing, for type-approval, roadworthiness periodical testing and service and repair workshops.

 

EGEA welcomes that the EMIS committee ongoing investigations call for better automotive emission measurements and monitoring, but as a balanced view between the environment and the industry.

EGEA supports this balanced approach, but additionally calls on the members of the European Parliament to ensure continued compliance throughout the whole life cycle of the vehicle.

 

Indeed, in-service conformity emission testing should be made more robust by improving the existing Periodic Technical Inspection (PTI) emission tests to provide direct and independent in-use emission assessments of the vehicles on Europe?s roads. This is also increasingly important for both direct injection petrol engine vehicles, which are a source of particulates as well as for diesel engine vehicles, which are the principal sources of both NOx emissions and of particulates.

 

However, in spite of the recent VW ?defeat devices? issue, PTI legislation is introducing a new test method where the vehicle is allowed to test itself (OBD testing), without any independent assessment. This situation arises as part of the Roadworthiness Directive 2014/45/EU, where independent emission testing using direct tailpipe measurement (measured at the end of the exhaust), can be replaced with an on-board diagnostic (OBD) test for Euro 6/VI vehicles.

 

The OBD system is not an emissions test, but is a diagnostic monitoring of the components that are part of the vehicle?s emission control system. A recent independent study by CITA (International Motor Vehicle Inspection Committee) and with extensive PTI testing evidence from France who have already introduced OBD tests, has shown that measurements via the OBD system are not sufficient to ensure that the exhaust emission levels continue to comply with the requirements.

 

OBD and tailpipe measurements provide different methods to find errors and are complementary, rather than being interchangeable. Both measurement methods are needed to be able to measure the correct functioning of the exhaust control system and for independent testing of the actual vehicle emissions.

 

For example, it is well known that many diesel vehicles have had their particulate filter or the EGR (exhaust gas re-circulation system) modified or removed and the engine management software changed to circumvent the OBD monitoring to avoid performance problems, especially in urban environments.

 

New vehicles emit lower levels of noxious exhaust emissions, creating the need to introduce emission test equipment that can accurately measure these lower levels to ensure continued compliance with their environmental requirements. Several studies in measuring particulate matter, NOx and diesel smoke measurements have shown that the current measured values, which are included in the Roadworthiness Directive 2014/45/EU, can and should be revised to address the required lower levels of emissions.

 

Subsequently, Member States can implement new test methods using this emission measuring equipment to establish a precise procedure to ensure accuracy of the measurements at these lower ?fine smoke? limits as the basis for effective emission testing using a combination of OBD and tailpipe test methods. Critically, current practice from some vehicle manufacturers is to limit engine speed, which restricts accurate emission testing. EGEA is therefore calling upon European legislators to ensure that engine speed is not limited when conducting a PTI emissions test and that this functionality should be verified as part of the original vehicle type-approval.

 

EGEA together with colleagues from CITA is currently conducting the Sustainable Emission Testing (SET) II Study to develop applicable test methods for NOx measurement of after-treatment systems during periodic emission tests (for both petrol and diesel vehicles). The results of this study should provide a practical solution in PTI test centres to help ensure continued environmental compliance throughout the life of the vehicle.

 

EGEA recognises and supports the focus of the EMIS Committee for better type approval emission testing, but therefore also strongly calls for testing of the emissions to be extended to cover the whole life of the vehicle.

 

EGEA therefore calls on European and national policymakers to continue to independently and directly test emissions at the tailpipe as the default measuring method in combination with an OBD test. EGEA further calls on members of the European Parliament, and particularly members of the EMIS Committee, to support  independent testing of vehicle exhaust emissions by directly measuring particulates and NOx contaminants as a robust control within the PTI test during the whole lifecycle of the vehicle. This would actively and positively contribute to minimizing the impact on human health and the environment of these noxious emissions.

 

***

Further technical considerations?

To ensure that independent in-service monitoring of vehicle exhaust emissions provides a practical and robust assessment of the actual levels of the exhaust emissions being created by the vehicle being tested, EGEA propose the following levels and measurements should be used for direct tailpipe testing:

 

The PTI test limits for diesel vehicles (as shown in the "CITA SET study") should be:

 

For diesel vehicles

  • For Euro 3 vehicles, the current values are acceptable
  • For Euro 4 vehicles because some are equipped with Diesel Particle Filters and the test limit value should be the vehicle?s ?plate? value, but with a maximum value of 1.0 m-1 when measured using the existing free acceleration test method. For Euro 5 and later vehicles, an overall limit for all diesel vehicles of 0.2 m-1 is recommended, when measured using the existing free acceleration test method.

 

For vehicles whose Diesel Particulate Filters (DFPs) are not functioning correctly and to satisfy the above limit values, it is necessary to use a high resolution smoke meter which has a resolution of 0.001 m-1 K-value.

 

Furthermore and specifically for diesel vehicles, the following parameters from the OBD could also be recorded and evaluated:

  • Maximum engine speed settings*
  • Time taken to conduct each ?free acceleration? to ensure consistent and accurate test procedures

 

Additionally, the use of OBD data will provide additional important information for the emissions test for both petrol and diesel vehicles e.g.:

  • Engine temperature
  • Engine speed*
  • Diagnostic trouble codes (DTC?s), system readiness monitors, after-treatment system status etc.

 

SETII study is assessing the most effective test methods to measure NOx and to detect if the DPF is still fitted and working correctly.

 

* Some vehicle manufacturers limit the engine speed when the vehicle is stationary, restricting accurate emission testing.

 

***

For any further information, please contact the EGEA Secretariat: secretariat@egea-association.eu

Official publication of the new Commission Blue Guide on EU product rules 2016 - 06/04/2016

On the 5th of April 2016,the European Commission officially adopted and published its new 'Blue Guide' on the implementation of EU product rules - 2016".

Since the previous Blue Guide was published in 2000, this new version of the Guide will be build on the past edition, but including now new chapters (e.g. chapters on the obligations of economic operators or accreditation) or completely revised chapters (e.g. chapters on standardisation or market surveillance).

This Guide is intended to contribute to a better understanding of EU product rules and to their more uniform and coherent application across different sectors and throughout the single market. It is addressed to the Member States and others stakeholders who need to be informed of the provisions designed to ensure the free circulation of products as well as a high level of protection throughout the Union (e.g. trade and consumer associations, standardisation bodies, manufacturers, importers, distributors, conformity assessment bodies and trade unions).


IARC classifies diesel engine exhaust as carcinogenic to humans - 25/06/2012

IARC classifies diesel engine exhaust as carcinogenic to humans: EGEA calls upon the EU and Member States to take more decisive measures to reduce exposure to hazardous vehicle exhaust emissions.

 

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), which is part of the World Health Organisation (WHO), on 12 June 2012 classified diesel engine exhaust as carcinogenic to humans, based on verified evidence that exposure is associated with an increased risk of both lung and bladder cancer.

“The scientific evidence was compelling and the working group’s conclusion was unanimous: diesel engine exhaust causes lung cancer in humans”, said the chairperson of the IARC working group which reviewed the evidence, Dr. Christopher Portier.  He added that “given the additional health impacts from diesel particulates, exposure to this mixture of chemicals should be reduced worldwide”.

 More than a decade after it was classified as ‘probably carcinogenic to humans’, this classification change by IARC now indicates the urgent need to reduce exhaust emissions from diesel engines and the EU should take appropriate measures to protect workers who are working in an enclosed environment. This is especially important when diesel engines are being run within an enclosed environment such as a vehicle repair workshop, bus depot or garage.

Workers in the motor vehicle sector are particularly exposed to diesel exhaust emissions. Although modern diesel engine vehicle technology controls particulate emission levels, there are still tens of millions of older vehicles that generate serious health hazards. It is therefore essential that the risks are assessed and prevention control methods are implemented to reduce or eliminate the risks posed.

This is why EGEA calls upon the European Commission and Member States to more decisively implement existing Directives on the protection of the health and safety of workers from the risks related to exposure to carcinogens or mutagens at work. This should be achieved through the mandatory use of exhaust extraction systems or exhaust filters in the working environment to protect workshop technicians and others workers by improving the quality of the indoor atmosphere. The exhaust emissions should be captured at source which means directly at the exhaust tailpipe. This should be done particularly in light of the current EU Air Pollution Policy Review 2011-2013.

 

EGEA also would like to take this opportunity to express its wholehearted support to the official ‘Working together for risk prevention’ Campaign launched on June 18th by the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA) together with its European campaign partners of its Healthy Workplaces Campaign 2012-2013 which encourages managers, workers and other stakeholders to join forces to improve safety and health.

 

For further information, please contact Eléonore van Haute at the EGEA Secretariat on +32 2 761 95 15 or at secretariat@egea-association.eu

 

Official publication of the Euro VI Implementing Measures for Heavy Duty Vehicles - Regulation (EU) N64/2012 - 31/01/2012

On the 31st January 2012, the European Commission officially published the Euro VI Implementing Measures (technical part) on emissions and access to OBD, Repair and Maintenance Information (RMI) for heavy duty vehicles under the new Regulation (EU) N°64/2012.

With the publication, this Regulation entered into force on Tuesday, and it will be mandatory as from 1st January 2013 for newly type approved vehicles.

This new legislative act transfers, in essence, the Euro 5/6 provisions on access to RMI to heavy duty vehicles. It specifies in greater detail the technical modalities for vehicle manufacturers to make technical information available for Independent Operators.

 In summary, the new Regulation includes:

  • a detailed list of what is considered as technical information;
  • OBD information needed for generic diagnostic tools and test equipment;
  • specific information (parameters) for parts producers needed for the manufacturing of OBD compatible replacement parts;
  • the recent Euro 5/6 amendments package of June 2011 (i.e. parts identification data, validation of VCIs, work units, access to the electronic service handbook)

When transferring the provisions from passenger cars and light-duty vehicles (Euro 5/6 provisions), the European Commission also duly considered the peculiarities and technical specificities of Heavy Duty Vehicles. Therefore, and following several months of working groups comprising vehicle manufacturers and independent operators, the new HDV Regulation also embraces specific derogations and exemptions for ‘customer adaptations’, ‘vehicles produced in small volumes’ and ‘ECU carry over systems from previous models’.

 

Please find hereafter the link under which you can find the text in English: Euro VI Implementing Measures - New Regulation (EU) N°64/2012

Access to OBD & RMI for Motorbikes, Agricultural and Forestry Vehicles - 06/12/2011

 

Motorbikes, Agricultural and Forestry Vehicles – MEPs vote to ensure access to OBD, repair and maintenance information (RMI) for Independent Operators

 

The Members of the European Parliament’s Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) approved the report of Antonio Panzeri (Socialist Party/Italy) on the type-approval of agricultural and forestry vehicles and also the report of Wim van de Camp (Conservative Party/Netherlands) on the type-approval of two-or three-wheel vehicles and quadricycles.

 

EGEA welcomes the IMCO votes because they reaffirm the principle set out by the European Commission that manufacturers must also provide access to technical information for motorcycles and agricultural and forestry vehicles. This is an important signal for the many independent repairers and equipment and parts producers active in this aftermarket segment. The vote has a lighthouse effect and is an example of consistent EU policy-making. The EU legislator now confers similar rights on independent operators for two-wheelers and tractors as have already been given for passenger cars and heavy duty vehicles, as advocated by EGEA. This now puts all categories on an equal footing.

 

In the case of agricultural and forestry vehicles, a number of amendments had been proposed which would have removed the right of independent operators to access RMI. EGEA welcomes that the IMCO Members rejected these proposals in favour of a fairer compromise and thereby paved the way for free and effective competition in the aftermarket. To respond however to specificities of agricultural and forestry machines (e.g. production in small volumes, customised trailers or interchangeable towed equipment) the Parliamentarians called for proportionality and called upon the European Commission to tackle these in the ensuing technical implementing measures.

 

For the report on the two-or three-wheel vehicles, the EU Parliamentarians set out a timeline for the introduction of On Board Diagnostics (OBD) on each category of motorcycles. Along with reasserting the principle of fair access to repair and maintenance information, they also supported the mandatory EU-wide introduction of the Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) for all new type-approved motorbikes over 50cc in 2016 rather than 2017 as originally proposed.

 

The dates of application for the two new pieces of legislation (2013 or 2014 for motorcycles and 2014 or 2016 for tractors) are still under negotiation between the European Parliament and the EU Commission.

 

Next steps: Both IMCO Reports will now have to be voted on in the European Parliament’s plenary session (provisionally be scheduled for February 2012) in Strasbourg and will also have to be accepted by the Council of Ministers as part of the co-decision procedure.

 

For further information, please contact Eleonore van Haute at the EGEA Secretariat on +32 2 761 95 15 or at secretariat@egea-association.eu

 

Learn about the aftermarket! - 00/00/0000
Learn about the aftermarket! - 00/00/0000

<iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/166207921" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe> <p><a href="https://vimeo.com/166207921">See the big picture - short version 2016-04-29</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/user52096434">eleonore van haute</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>